Understanding Personal Responsibility – Action Exercises

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You Are 100% Responsible For Your Life! – PART I Chapter 1 – Understanding Personal Responsibility – Action Exercises

Write down three specific goals that you want to achieve in your personal or professional life and how taking responsibility can help you achieve them.

Here is one possible example:

  • Goal: To learn a new language (e.g., Spanish) and become fluent in it.
  • How taking responsibility can help: Taking responsibility means that you acknowledge that you are the one who is in charge of your own learning and progress. You do not blame external factors or circumstances for your difficulties or failures. You do not make excuses or procrastinate on your tasks. You do not rely on others to teach you or motivate you. Instead, you take action and initiative to achieve your goal. You set realistic and specific objectives and deadlines for yourself. You plan your study schedule and stick to it. You use various resources and methods to learn and practice the language. You seek feedback and improvement from others who are more proficient or native speakers. You celebrate your achievements and reward yourself for your efforts. You persist and overcome any challenges or setbacks that may arise.

This is one example of a goal and how taking responsibility can help you achieve it. You can use this example as a guide or create your own goal and explanation based on your own situation. Writing down your goals and how taking responsibility can help you achieve them can help you clarify your vision, motivate yourself, and inspire others.

Identify one area of your life where you have been avoiding responsibility and list the negative consequences of doing so. Then, write down one action step that you can take today to start taking responsibility in that area.

One possible example of an area of your life where you have been avoiding responsibility and the negative consequences of doing so is:

  • Area: Your health and fitness.
  • Negative consequences: You have been neglecting your physical well-being by eating unhealthy food, skipping exercise, and sleeping irregularly. This has resulted in you gaining weight, feeling tired, and having low self-esteem. You have also increased your risk of developing various diseases and complications such as diabetes, heart problems, and depression. You have also affected your performance and relationships at work, school, or home by being less productive, creative, and sociable.

One action step that you can take today to start taking responsibility in that area is:

  • Action step: You can start by making a small but positive change in your diet, such as replacing one junk food item with a healthy snack, such as a fruit, a nut, or a yogurt. You can also drink more water and less soda or alcohol. You can also do a simple but effective exercise, such as walking, jogging, or stretching for at least 15 minutes. You can also set a regular bedtime and wake-up time and stick to it. You can also track your progress and reward yourself for your efforts.
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This is one possible example of an area of your life where you have been avoiding responsibility and the negative consequences of doing so, and one action step that you can take today to start taking responsibility in that area. You can use this example as a guide or create your own example based on your own situation.

Reflect on a time when you took responsibility for your actions, choices, and outcomes and write down how it made you feel. Share your experience with a friend, family member, or mentor and ask for their feedback.

One possible scenario for reflecting on a time when you took responsibility for your actions, choices, and outcomes and how it made you feel is:

  • Scenario: You had a project deadline at school or work that you missed because you procrastinated and did not manage your time well. You felt guilty, ashamed, and stressed. You decided to take responsibility for your mistake and apologise to your teacher or boss. You also explained what caused the delay and how you planned to fix it. You also asked for their feedback and support. You worked hard to complete the project as soon as possible and delivered a high-quality result. You felt relieved, proud, and motivated.
  • How it made you feel: Taking responsibility for your actions, choices, and outcomes made you feel more in control of your situation and more accountable for your results. It also made you feel more honest, respectful, and trustworthy to yourself and others. It also made you feel more confident, competent, and productive in your work. It also made you feel more grateful, appreciative, and collaborative with your teacher or boss and classmates or colleagues.

This is one possible scenario for reflecting on a time when you took responsibility for your actions, choices, and outcomes and how it made you feel. You can use this scenario as a guide or create your own scenario based on your own experience.

Find a role model who exemplifies personal responsibility and learn from their example. You can read their biography, watch their interviews, or follow their social media accounts. Write down three traits or habits that they have that you admire and want to emulate.

Three possible people to pick from for finding a role model who exemplifies personal responsibility that you can learn from their example.

  • Malala Yousafzai: Malala Yousafzai is a Pakistani activist, Nobel laureate, and UN Messenger of Peace. She is best known for her advocacy for girls’ education and human rights. She survived a Taliban assassination attempt when she was 15 years old and became a global symbol of courage and hope. She founded the Malala Fund, a non-profit organization that supports girls’ education around the world. She also wrote a bestselling memoir, I Am Malala, and a children’s book, Malala’s Magic Pencil. She is currently studying at Oxford University.
  • Barack Obama: Barack Obama is an American politician, lawyer, author, and former president of the United States. He is best known for being the first African American president of the United States and for his achievements in domestic and foreign policy. He passed the Affordable Care Act, which expanded health care coverage for millions of Americans. He also signed the Paris Agreement, which aimed to combat climate change. He also received the Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts to promote international cooperation and diplomacy. He also wrote several bestselling books, including Dreams from My Father, The Audacity of Hope, and A Promised Land. He is currently leading the Obama Foundation, which seeks to inspire and empower young leaders around the world.
  • J.K. Rowling: J.K. Rowling is a British author, philanthropist, and producer. She is best known for creating the Harry Potter series, which has become one of the most popular and successful literary franchises in history. She wrote the seven books of the series while struggling with poverty, depression, and single parenthood. She also created the Fantastic Beasts series, which is a spin-off of the Harry Potter universe. She also wrote several other books under different pen names, such as The Casual Vacancy, The Cuckoo’s Calling, and The Ickabog. She also founded Lumos, a charity that works to end the institutionalization of children around the world.
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These are three possible people to pick from for finding a role model who exemplifies personal responsibility and learning from their example. You can choose one of them or someone else who inspires you and follow their example. You can also share your choice and your reasons with someone who supports you and ask for their feedback. 

Whenever you face a challenge, setback, or mistake write it down. Then practice saying, “I am responsible” Notice how this statement empowers you to take action and learn from the situation instead of blaming others or making excuses.

One possible example of a challenge, setback, or mistake that you can write down is:

  • Challenge, setback, or mistake: You applied for a promotion at work, but you did not get it. You felt disappointed, frustrated, and discouraged. You wondered what you did wrong and why you were not good enough.
  • Saying “I am responsible”: Instead of blaming others or making excuses, you can say “I am responsible” for your situation. This statement empowers you to take action and learn from the situation instead of feeling helpless or hopeless. For example, you can say “I am responsible for my career development and growth. I am responsible for seeking feedback and improvement. I am responsible for exploring other opportunities and options. I am responsible for maintaining a positive and proactive attitude.”

This is one possible example of a challenge, setback, or mistake that you can write down and practice saying “I am responsible”. You can use this example as a guide or create your own example based on your own situation. Writing down your challenges, setbacks, or mistakes and saying “I am responsible” can help you develop personal responsibility and resilience.

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Create a personal responsibility journal where you record your daily actions, choices, and outcomes. At the end of each day, review your journal and evaluate how well you took responsibility for your life. Celebrate your successes and identify areas for improvement.

One possible task is to record choosing breakfast in your personal responsibility journal:

  • Date: April 6, 2023
  • Action: I chose to have a healthy and delicious breakfast that consisted of oatmeal with fruit and nuts, yogurt with honey, and green tea with lemon and ginger.
  • Choice: I chose this breakfast because I wanted to have a balanced and nutritious meal that would give me energy and satisfaction for the day. I also wanted to support my health and wellness goals by eating foods that are rich in fiber, protein, antioxidants, and anti-inflammatory compounds.
  • Outcome: The outcome of this breakfast was that I felt full, happy, and refreshed. I also felt more alert, focused, and productive in my work. I also felt more confident, positive, and motivated in my mood.

Write a list of tasks that you need to do and prioritise them according to their importance and urgency.

Some examples of things that would go on a list of tasks that you need to do and prioritise them according to their importance and urgency are:

  • Task: Pay your bills
    • Importance: High
    • Urgency: High
    • Reason: Paying your bills on time is important to avoid late fees, penalties, or interest charges. It is also urgent because most bills have a due date that you need to meet.
  • Task: Study for an exam
    • Importance: High
    • Urgency: Medium
    • Reason: Studying for an exam is important to prepare yourself for the test and achieve a good grade. It is also urgent if the exam is coming soon, but not as urgent as paying your bills.
  • Task: Clean your house
    • Importance: Medium
    • Urgency: Low
    • Reason: Cleaning your house is important to maintain a healthy and comfortable living environment. It is also urgent if you have guests coming over, but not as urgent as studying for an exam.
  • Task: Watch a movie
    • Importance: Low
    • Urgency: Low
    • Reason: Watching a movie is not very important or urgent, unless it is for educational or entertainment purposes. It is something that you can do in your spare time or when you need a break.

These are some examples of things that would go on a list of tasks that you need to do and prioritise them according to their importance and urgency. You can use these examples as a guide or create your own list based on your own situation. Prioritising your tasks can help you manage your time and resources more effectively and efficiently.

You can benefit from reviewing these exercises periodically and comparing your current answers with your previous ones. This will help you see how much progress you have made and reflect on your growth.